242 weeks since last adult wolf release!
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Action Alert: Help Stop Wolf Removals Happening Now

We have heard from reliable sources that a wolf removal with permission to kill is happening now in Arizona! Take action to let US Fish & Wildlife know we do not support taking wolves from the wild!

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We have received information that the US Fish & Wildlife Service has issued a removal order that includes permission to kill a wolf, if necessary. The wolf is currently on national forest lands in Arizona. Due to an agency policy not to let the public know when removals are happening, we have not been able to get more exact information about this trapping operation.


We need YOU to help ensure that decision-makers in the US Fish & Wildlife understand just how many more people want the wolves left in the wild than are worried about a few cattle or sheep that could be moved.


Please take a moment and contact the following people to convey your support for wild Mexican wolves! You can use the talking points below to create your own personal message.



CONTACT DECISION-MAKERS TODAY! THANK YOU!

Brady McGee, Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator, US Fish & Wildlife Service, brady_mcgee@fws.gov, 505-761-4748

Amy Lueders, SW Regional Director, US Fish & Wildlife Service, RDLueders@fws.gov, 505-248-6911

David Bernhardt, Secretary of the Interior, 1-202-208-3100


TALKING POINTS:

  • We have recently become concerned that an order has been put in place to remove Mexican wolves from the wild. Because the US Fish & Wildlife has a policy of not making these removal orders transparent to the public, we are left to assume the worst and hope that we can intervene and stop it from happening.

  • It's unacceptable to removal wild wolves at this point in the recovery process; every wolf on the ground is essential.

  • Leave the wolves alone and work with the rancher to move the cattle.

  • Millions of more Americans would rather see lobos recovered than are worried about a dozen cows or sheep.

  • Wolves die during non-lethal capture operations too, and it's not worth the risk.

  • Removals are disruptive to pack dynamics and can engender even further conflict.