Lobos of the Southwest

News Archive

Recent Pupdates




What You Can Do

Tell US Fish and Wildlife Service: Release Mexican Wolves Into New Mexico Before It's Too Late

Sign the Petition and Write a Letter, Southwest Environmental Center, posted 04/01/2012

none

There are only about 50 Mexican gray wolves ("lobos") in the wilds of New Mexico and Arizona--not enough to ensure their survival. More than 300 lobos are in captivity, waiting to be released into the wild as part of a reintroduction program. Releasing wolves directly into New Mexico--where the best remaining unoccupied habitat exists--is critical to quickly boosting numbers and gene diversity in the wild population, but for bureaucratic reasons the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) won't do it, citing an outdated rule that prevents direct releases into New Mexico. The FWS could easily change this rule by issuing an Environmental Assessment and putting it out for public review, but it refuses to do so. Tell the FWS to take action before it's too late for Mexican wolves.

On behalf of the more than 19000 wolf supporters who signed this petition, we call on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to release more endangered Mexican wolves into New Mexico before it is too late. The 2011 census numbers are out and there are 58 Mexican gray wolves ("lobos") in the wilds of New Mexico and Arizona. Though this is a modest increase from 2010, this is not enough to ensure their survival. More than 300 lobos languish in captivity, waiting to be released into the wild as part of a reintroduction program. Releasing wolves directly into New Mexico--where the best remaining unoccupied habitat exists--is critical to quickly boosting numbers and gene diversity in the wild population, but for bureaucratic reasons the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) won't do it, citing an outdated rule that prevents direct releases into New Mexico. The FWS could easily change this rule by issuing an Environmental Assessment and putting it out for public review, but it refuses to do so.

We believe this evidence of great public support for the direct release of Mexican wolves into New Mexico should not be ignored. We call on you to support the actions necessary to achieve this end.

If I can provide additional information, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Thanks for your time.

Jason Burke
Field Organizer
SW Environmental Center
jason@wildmesquite.org
(575)522-5552

Sign the petition here.


Please take a little more time and contact Ken Salazar directly!  
Tell him it’s time to put more wolves into the wild
where they belong.

Below are a few suggestions for ensuring your message gets through clearly.  In your message, you can include the points below, but please use your own words so that your message will be more effective.  If you need additional help or want someone to review your letter before you send it, email it to info@mexicanwolves.org:


- Mexican gray wolves need to live wild, and wild places need them.

- New releases of wolves into the wild are needed badly to bolster the population of only 58 wolves that remain in the wild. Newly released wolves will not only increase population numbers but will also improve the wild population’s genetics.

- The AZ Game and Fish Commission’s decision to oppose new releases makes changing the rule to allow direct releases into New Mexico even more critical than ever.

- There have been no releases of new Mexican wolves into the wild since November 2008. As the agency with ultimate authority and responsibility for restoring the Mexican wolf, the US Fish and Wildlife Service should be
doing anything it can do to confirm its commitment to the wolf’s success in the wild.

- Talk about who you are and why Mexican wolf recovery is important to you, personally.

Please add your name and address at the end, because anonymous letters get little attention. Remember, too, that polite requests are more effective.

You can find background information on what is delaying the release of more Mexican wolves into the wild in this article.


Send your e-mail to Secretary of the Interior, Ken Salazar: exsec@ios.doi.gov

Please send us a copy as well, so that we can track the actions taken to save these wonderful animals.

If you are more comfortable speaking you mind, you can call Interior Secretary
Ken Salazar at 202-208-7351.

Thank you for all you do.

photo courtesy of Allen S.