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Take Action: Movie Misrepresenting Wolves Opens This Weekend!

Tell Moviegoers the Positive Truth About Wolves (posted January 28, 2012)

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Wolves have been trapped, poisoned and hunted to the brink of extinction on behalf of the livestock industry, and received little popular defense because of age-old prejudices against these amazing but misunderstood animals. Unfortunately, movies like The Grey perpetuate negative stereotypes of wolves by portraying them as vicious monsters out to hurt human beings. Nothing could be further from the truth.

You can counteract the false message in the movie by distributing a one-page fact sheet at movie theaters showing The Grey.

Here’s what it says:

  • Wolves are native to much of the United States, but most were wiped out early in the 20th century by a government extermination campaign.
  • Wolves are generally shy of people and make every effort to avoid contact with them.
  • You are more likely to be killed by lightning than by a wolf.
  • Wolves are “family oriented” social animals. They live in extended families called packs.
  • Each member of a pack helps, from hunting to caring for pups.
  • Wolves are very beautiful and intelligent animals with emotions.
  • Wolves help create and maintain a strong and healthy ecosystem.
  • Over $35 million is generated by wolf-related tourism around Yellowstone each year.
  • Wolves get a bad rap because of the many myths associated with them in books and movies.

You can learn more at these websites:

www.mexicanwolves.org
www.gcwolfrecovery.org
http://www.Wolfwatcher.org
www.westernwolves.org

Thank you for taking the time to educate yourself and your family about wolves.

Mexican wolf artwork courtesy of Sarah Rose
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How to distribute the fact sheets effectively:

  1. Download and print copies of the fact sheet here.
  2. Enlist the help of one or more people to make this a safe and comfortable experience.
  3. Wear something that identifies you with wolves - a large button with a wolf image, or a sign that says something like "Ask me about the truth about wolves.”
  4. Do not do anything illegal.
  5. Be courteous and non-confrontational.  This means:
  • Remember that your goal is to help educate people in a friendly way.
  • Do not ask people not to see the movie or condemn them for doing so.
  • Keep your conversation along the lines of: “Hi. If you’re going to see (or if you just watched) The Grey, can I give you some information about wolves?” Hand them the fact sheet and say thank you.
  • If people genuinely want to talk more, keep the focus on the importance of wolves and the danger many of them are in.
  • If people want to argue, don’t waste your time or energy. Agree to disagree and move on to someone else.
  • Do not gang up on any one individual.

If you want more information before heading out, contact us at info@mexicanwolves.org.

Thank you for helping to set the record straight on wolves!