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In the News: Two dedicated girls rally for wolves

Sonoran News – June 22, 2016

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The future for wolves is looking up thanks to two special young ladies. Brianna Edwards and Madalynn Zepp created a charity called “Lobo Paws.”

Their goal is to help save wolves and spread awareness of the plight of the Mexican gray wolf. Their charity’s fundraising efforts included holding a booth at the Avondale Kidsfest, putting on their own yard sale fundraiser, collecting prizes for a raffle and selling raffle tickets and a school fundraiser. They raised $1,048.00 for Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center!

Along with the money, they also collected about four bins of items from our Wish List through their school! Howls of thanks to Brianna and Madalynn and everyone who supported their good work for wolves!

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This article was published in the Sonoran News.

Learn more about the Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center here.

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Brianna Edwards has been an advocate for Mexican wolves for over two years.  In addition to her fund raising efforts, Brianna has spoken at Fish and Wildlife Service public hearings, and sent letters to the editor.  Here is a video of her when she was just eight years old preparing her speech for the August 2014 public hearing in Pinetop, AZ.

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If an eight year old can speak for Mexican wolves, so can YOU.

Tell US Fish and Wildlife Service 
Lobos need improved genetics and a science based recovery plan!


A sample message is below-remember that it will be most effective written in your own words, from your own experience.

Dear Secretary Jewell,

Mexican gray wolves are important to me and the majority of voters, and their recovery can help restore ecological health to our wildlands. But there is no up-to-date, valid recovery plan for Mexican gray wolves, and new management rules for the wolves contradict the recovery recommendations of leading wolf experts. 

Very few wolves have been released into the wild and this year, the wild population declined for the first time in six years, from 110 wolves last year to only 97. 

Instread of allowing political interference by the states of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah, the US Fish and Wildlife Service must expedite the release of adults and families of wolves from captivity and must move forward with  the draft recovery plan based on the work of the science planning subgroup.

Obstruction by anti-wolf special interests and politics has kept this small population of unique and critically endangered wolves at the brink of extinction for too long and can no longer be allowed to do so.  Development of a new recovery plan and expedited releases that will together address decreased genetic health and ensure long-term resiliency in Mexican wolf populations must move forward without delay or political interference.

Sincerely,

[Your name and address]


You can make your letter more compelling by talking about your personal connection to wolves and why the issue is important to you.  If you’re a camper or hiker wanting to hear wolves in the wild, or a hunter who recognizes that wolves make game herds healthier, or a businessperson who knows that wolves have brought millions in ecotourism dollars to Yellowstone, say so.

Please email your letter to Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe.

You can also copy your email to your members of congress, whose contact information can be found here. Include your full name, address, and phone number.